In the Great Smoky Mountains, fireflies have become a source of tourism —and solace

in the great smoky mountains fireflies have become a source of tourism and solace

Sumary of In the Great Smoky Mountains, fireflies have become a source of tourism —and solace:

  • I’ve been in Great Smoky Mountains National Park for less than an hour when I’m mistaken for a woodland fairy.
  • The firefly event in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which straddles this section of Tennessee and my home state of North Carolina, draws seekers from across the continent.
  • Years ago, the National Park Service instituted a lottery for people to secure passes, since the species’ growing popularity raised concerns about conservation.
  • According to the International Dark-Sky Association, 99 percent of people in the United States don’t have access to natural night anymore, the blinking sun-and-moon patterns with which we evolved.
  • Internationally, artificial light pollution is growing at a rate of 2 percent a year with no signs of slowing.
  • Firefly habitat is so specific, so mercurial, that it’s possible to see a great show from one section of the trail while another remains relatively dark.

Want to know more click here go to source.

From -

Close
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Menu

Site Language


By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close